Once you have made the decision to incorporate your business, and gone through the formation process, it can feel like your company is ready to take on the world. However, there is one important item that cannot be neglected: the minute book. A minute book is the living official record of a business and contains all of the important documents to reflect the business’ history.

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Maintaining organized records in a minute book is critical for any business.  For example, when a company seeks a new loan, raises funds via new investors, or becomes the target of an acquisition, it must undergo due diligence and produce its minutes to prove it has complied with both regulatory and its own self-governing documents such as its charter and bylaws.

The minute book begins with a business’ incorporation documents, including its articles of incorporation and bylaws (or articles of organization and operating agreement, if it’s an LLC). As time passes, and if the minute book is properly maintained, it will contain the documents that, among other things: authenticate compliance with governing documents via board and equity holder consents; confirm the company’s officers, directors and/or managers, who may resign or be replaced from time-to-time; and substantiate the capitalization of the company by memorializing changes in equity ownership.  Having a complete and current record streamlines any due diligence process and increases the company’s credibility from the very beginning.

Furthermore, the minute book will contain the “minutes” from the company’s annual and special board and equity holder meetings. The minutes are a written description of what took place at the meetings and serve to memorialize the actions taken by those in attendance during the meeting.  These records are valuable for preserving institutional memory, ensuring compliance with the company’s constitutional documents, and substantiating board or shareholder actions and processes if challenged later.

A corporation that commits to maintaining its minute book can save substantial time, money, and stress when it is called for review. On the other hand, neglecting to document the corporation’s history as it occurs can leave the company stuck trying to piece together years, if not decades, of information when the pressure is on to produce the records.