Startups represented by seedling growthStartup clients often rely on independent contractors and advisors during their early stages but do not have the cash to pay them, so they turn to equity compensation. Stock options are a great incentive tool, but founders should consider the following before issuing options to advisors or independent contractors:

  1. How Much?: Most founders grant early advisors and contractors options that cover anywhere from 0.10% to 1% of the company’s fully diluted stock on a case-by-case basis. Founders should consider (i) how important the advisor or contractor is to the success of the company, (ii) how much time the advisor will commit to the company, and (iii) the maturity level of the company and its future growth prospects. Advisors and contractors may talk to one another about their option grants, so be consistent and prepared to explain the rationale behind the grants.
  2. Vesting: Just like option grants to employees, advisor grants should be subject to a vesting schedule. Advisor grants typically vest on a monthly basis without a cliff over a period of 12-24 months, although shorter or longer vesting schedules may be appropriate. In certain scenarios, vesting schedules for independent contractors may be customized so that all or a significant portion of the grants do not vest until completion of the project for which the contractor was hired.
  3. Exercise Period: Vested Incentive Stock Options (ISOs), which can only be granted to employees, must be exercised within three (3) months after the employee’s termination. This is not the case for Non-Qualified Stock Options (NSOs) issued to contractors and advisors, but most equity incentive plans require both types of options to be exercised within the three (3) month period. Experienced advisors may negotiate to extend the exercise period because they do not have the cash to exercise the options or are not prepared to pay the tax associated with exercising the options. Depending on the relationship with the advisor, it may be in the company’s best interests to extend the exercise period, especially with advisors who may be able to help the company in the future through their expertise or connections.
  4. Intellectual Property: All advisors should sign some form of confidentiality and invention assignment agreement. Although many advisors or contractors may resist, such agreements can be tailored to address the advisor’s concerns while still protecting the company ownership of its intellectual property, which is key to the company’s future success and ability to obtain venture financing.