Mergers and Acquisitions

Startups represented by seedling growthFor early-stage companies in need of capital, finding potential investors can be difficult and time-consuming, especially when conditions in the capital markets are tight. For many companies, using a “finder,” an individual or entity that identifies, introduces and negotiates with potential investors, to help locate potential investors may seem to be a promising solution to

Quick quiz:

  • If your startup is seeking investors, will you have more success with private equity or venture capital firms?
  • How about when you’re looking to sell that company?

Businessman giving Vulcan greeting from Star TrekThe answers are (1) venture capital and (2) private equity.  If you weren’t sure, you’re not alone; the terms are often confused or used interchangeably. 

Debra L. Gruenstein writes:

Private equity firms have recently been deploying capital to purchase medical and dental practices.

Caduceus casting a dollar sign shadowThe typical transaction would involve the purchase of multiple practices and the establishment of a management company. The physicians would be paid a multiple of earnings and receive some rollover equity in the management company. Although many

Barbara P. Alonso writes:

The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), an inter-agency committee led by the U.S. Treasury Department that reviews foreign direct investment transactions, is likely to be applied in a more stringent manner by the Trump Administration. Members of Congress and of the Trump administration have advocated for enhanced

Issuers and investors are well advised to document their deal in a term sheet.  Though generally non-binding, they add significant value.  Detailed term sheets raise issues early when there is still ample negotiating time. They also make drafting the definitive documents more efficient, saving on legal fees. However, parties must be vigilant to document the

As mentioned in the first post of this series, the goal of many entrepreneurs is to seek venture capital financing or ultimately sell their company in an “exit” merger or acquisition. Upon making representations and warranties (which are essentially, assurances) associated with any of these transactions, the seller opens itself up to risk. If

For investors and founders of emerging tech companies, leaving money on the table is a tragedy which can never be remedied once it occurs. An exit sale to or investment from a large strategic buyer is for many young tech companies a once-in-a-lifetime event with enormous economic consequences impacting both the company’s founders and investors.

The goal of many entrepreneurs is to seek venture capital financing or ultimately sell their company in an “exit” merger or acquisition. In each case, the company’s historical operations come under onerous pressure through the representations and warranties the seller is asked to make, and the related due diligence the seller must produce. To a

Philadelphia skyline
Copyright: sepavo / 123RF Stock Photo

A group of Philadelphia-area companies and organizations just released a joint study describing the state of the information technology industry in the region. The group is composed of Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Southeastern PA, CEO Council for Growth, Select Greater Philadelphia, Ernst &