Copyright: kentoh / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: kentoh / 123RF Stock Photo

Entrepreneurs who form, but ultimately do not activate, business entities may be vulnerable to identity theft.  In a new post on our Privacy Compliance and Data Security blog, my colleagues Jeff FriedmanAndrew Halbert and Joseph Superstein explore the rising number of business identity theft cases.

In particular, they note scams in which criminals seek to exploit state filing systems and business registration websites for financial gain. By filing bogus reports with Secretary of State offices or altering online business records, these criminals have been able to steal considerable amounts of cash and property using fraudulently obtained lines of credit. By altering business records, criminals may appear to have the authority to act on behalf of a victim entity, which in turn, enables them to apply for credit accounts with various lenders, retailers, and suppliers. I invite you to read their valuable discussion on reducing the risk associated with this growing criminal activity, by voluntarily and safely dissolving inactive business entities.

Copyright: vipdesignusa / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: vipdesignusa / 123RF Stock Photo

The US Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) announced today that it has reached the congressionally mandated H-1B cap for fiscal year (FY) 2016. The agency began accepting petitions from employers on April 1.

For more details, I invite you to read yet another excellent blog post by my colleague Catherine Wadhwani in Pittsburgh, writing for our Immigration View blog. In it, she provides a concise rundown on the latest from USCIS. And if you’d like to read more on the intersection between immigration and emerging companies, the Immigration View blog offers a Startup Companies category with relevant posts.

Copyright: vipdesignusa / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: vipdesignusa / 123RF Stock Photo

The US Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) has just issued a press release containing useful information for companies looking to hire a talented foreign professional worker who requires H-1B sponsorship. Emerging companies often face this challenge, so mark your calendars for April 1, 2015. That’s when USCIS will begin accepting petitions subject to the fiscal year 2016 H-1B visa cap.

For more details, I invite you to read another excellent blog post by my colleague Catherine Wadhwani in Pittsburgh, writing for our Immigration View blog. In it, she provides a concise rundown on the latest from USCIS.

Santa is rewarding angel investors for their generosity this year.  Such investors may be eligible for a 100% exemption for gains on investments made in 2014 in Qualified Small Business Stock.  The Angel Capital Association’s Angel Insights Blog provides details on the criteria and limitations:

http://www.angelcapitalassociation.org/blog/angels-100-exclusion-of-gains-now-law-for-2014-investments/

Copyright: vipdesignusa / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: vipdesignusa / 123RF Stock Photo

Although startups can offer unique opportunities for potential employees, emerging companies often face great competition in the hiring process.  Your company may be benefiting from the services of a talented foreign professional worker who requires H-1B sponsorship, or perhaps you’ve identified a foreign professional you’d like to hire.

Because cap-subject H-1B petitions are extremely time-sensitive, it’s best to be prepared.  As a start, I invite you to read an excellent blog post by my colleague Catherine Wadhwani in Pittsburgh, writing for our Immigration View blog. In it, she discusses the upcoming “H-1B cap season.”